What We Do Rhino Yard Expansion

Daniel Maltz Rhino Reserve

The Zoo and Cleveland Zoological Society are planning transformational changes to the current rhino habitat in the Zoo’s African Savanna destination.

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Kibibbi and her calf Lulu in 2018

The project plan includes an additional outdoor rhino yard that will more than double the size of the Zoo’s current habitat for its Eastern black rhino herd of five.

The expansion also includes an additional indoor rhino barn, as well as several new complexities within the habitat for the rhinos including overhead shade, misting areas, a mud wallow, vegetation, and scratching posts. Guest will be able to enjoy this new space from a larger and fully accessible viewing deck for guests. The project will be completed in late spring.

Since 1998, the Zoo Society has provided $30 million in funding for the Zoo's capital improvement projects. From past projects that are now guest favorites to upcoming habitats, the Zoo Society, with help from generous donors like you, works to support the Zoo's strategic plan.

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Conceptual Rendering of the Rhino Yard Expansion

Enhancing the Visitor Experience

The rhinos have proven to be a popular stop for the 1.1 million guests who visit the Zoo each year. This project not only expands the rhino yard but it also greatly expands the viewing deck for guests. The new deck will more than double the space for visitors and be fully accessible for guests of all abilities.

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Current view from the rhino habitat viewing deck

Advancing Conservation

A multi-billion dollar criminal industry, illegal wildlife trade is one of the top threats to wildlife globally, from rhinos to elephants, tigers, and more. The Zoo is working with and supporting more than a dozen partners around the world to intervene and disrupt the illegal wildlife trade chain. Zoos play an important role in international wildlife conservation efforts. Zoos also have the unique opportunity to educate and inspire guests on how animals they see in their communities are ambassadors for those in the wild. Inge, Kibibbi, Forrest, Lulu, and Nia are all ambassadors for rhinos in the wild and help educate the public about illegal wildlife trade.

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