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Wolf Lodge at Wilderness Trek turns 20

Wolf Lodge at Wilderness Trek opened in May 1997 with a focus on research and conservation of North American wildlife.

According to a 1997 edition of Z Magazine, the 3,000-square-foot log cabin was designed to look like a 19th-century trapper’s cabin, “still adorned with an antique stove, hand-made quilts, a Native American art, craft and tool collection, and snow shoes.”

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Almost two decades later, Wolf Lodge has retained that feel – with rocking chairs on the front porch and a Singer sewing machine among the artifacts inside. It has become a popular stop on a walk around Wilderness Trek, and the focus on conservation continues. A unique feature of Wolf Lodge is its step-down, immersive look at a stream-side habitat of animals some Zoo visitors might see in Ohio.

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A unique feature of Wolf Lodge is its step-down, immersive look at a stream-side habitat of animals some Zoo visitors might see in Ohio:

  • Beaver: This expert swimmer is among the easiest to spot in the water but be sure to check out his “lodge,” too. In the wild, beaver “lodges” are made from mud and branches and connected to a larger dam. The lodge is above water level, but most of the beavers’ time is spent in water.

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  • Brook trout: A large tank in the Wolf Lodge’s main room holds a school of these freshwater fish. Brook trout require cold, clear, well-oxygenated water and live close to shore in rivers and lakes. In 1997, the Ohio Division of Wildlife started reintroducing brook trout into healthy Ohio streams.

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  • Bald eagle: The Zoo’s majestic bald eagle arrived in 2016 from Nature’s Nursery in Whitehouse, Ohio. He was born in the wild but sustained a wing injury, which is severely detrimental to the carnivorous birds that have to fly and fish to catch their meals. Once rare in the wild, eagle populations across the country have rebounded.

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