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Zoo unveils new logo

The Zoo's recent rebranding campaign reinforces longstanding commitment to conservation

With 180 acres and 600 species, the Zoo has plenty of stories to educate and engage members and guests: From groundbreaking research in animal welfare and husbandry, to new habitats – Rosebrough Tiger Passage the most recent example – that mimic the complex landscape animals might find in the wild.

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But there’s one very important story that until recently might not have been obvious to Zoo guests.

“Cleveland Metroparks Zoo has been doing international conservation for over 20 years,” said Zoo Executive Director Christopher Kuhar, Ph.D. “But the question became, how do we communicate that to someone here on a day visit? It can be a hard story to tell.”

The Zoo works with more than two dozen conservation partners around the world to build conservation capacity, study and protect animals in the wild, and help train and support the next generation of conservationists. The Zoo’s conservation partners receive financial and programmatic support to make these efforts possible. Sometimes, Zoo staff even train and mentor students and teams of conservationists overseas.

Since 1998, the Zoo has dedicated more than $6.5 million to these international efforts. This support has come mostly from generous private philanthropy to the Cleveland Zoological Society, the nonprofit partner of the Zoo.

“It is incredibly exciting to be sharing our conservation mission with our guests and connecting them to the incredible work that we’re doing around the world,” said Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Curator of Conservation Kym Gopp. “Now that we have a recognizable and meaningful way to talk about our conservation efforts, we can really communicate to guests, and to the greater community in Northeast Ohio, how they can join us to secure a future for wildlife across the globe.”

This spring, the Zoo launched a rebranding campaign, a major step toward reminding members and visitors of its dedication to conservation and how they can be a part of the Zoo’s mission.The Cleveland Metroparks marketing team evaluated the new logo and tagline through research and found the public to be very supportive of the change. The Zoo’s former logo had not been fully updated since the 1970s, and as the conversation in zoos across North Amermica moves to conservation, it was time to embrace a new concept. Cleveland was one of the first Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) parks to have a field conservation program, and it is a legacy the staff works hard to convey. AZA research demonstrates that Zoo guests want to learn more about conservation and expect their zoo to be involved in protecting animals in the wild.

Zoo guests may notice new signage, bright blue uniform shirts and merchandise sporting a new logo and the Zoo’s new tagline: Securing a Future for Wildlife. A revamped website - FutureforWildlife.org - highlights conservation partnerships and species the Zoo is working to protect around the world. New educational programming is being developed with a focus on encouraging people to take action to support wildlife conservation while they are at the Zoo.

“I’m really excited to be talking about securing a future for wildlife, about our conservation programs and to be educating our guests, and at the same time, still being the same, fun zoo where people can come out and get nose to nose with a tiger at Rosebrough Tiger Passage or feed a giraffe at Ben Gogolick Giraffe Encounter,” said Kuhar. “I think it’s really exciting – and very important – to be able to meld the mission and those fun experiences that people enjoy.”

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